Monthly Archives: May 2015

Child Development

Well Bully On You Part I

Advice for Dealing With Bullies

I’d say it’s safe to assume that at some point in each of our lives, we’ve been the target of bullying in some way, shape, or form. Particularly with the uproar of sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, cyber-bullying in particular has become a problem with school-aged children as young as fourth and fifth grade. This, of course, is due in large part to our children growing up too fast in a world that is developing at an equally alarming rate, but nevertheless is cause for concern in parents and teachers alike. But when does bullying really begin? And how, once it’s begun, can we as parents and preschool San Diego teachers learn to end it quickly and swiftly.preschool bullying

Firstly, while preschoolers might not have the problems that their future selves will certainly have (puberty, crushes, ect…), and while they most definitely do not need to worry about cyber-bullying issues, they do encounter first hand bullying situations on an everyday basis. From the little girl who openly invites Susie, Sally, and Annie over to play after school, while leaving Cassie out, to the little boy who continually rejects Peter from playing in his sandbox but no one else, bullying is a very real problem. While most children might display feelings of hurt or anger at being forced to the sidelines, others will likely forget their feelings by the end of the day and move on, leaving parents none the wiser about bullying in the preschool San Diego school yard.

Luckily, handling the early signs and stages of bullying is something that most preschool teachers are prepared to do, but even so, understanding what you—the parent—can do while your child is outside of the preschool San Diego realm, can help but a stop to bullying before it gets out of hand as well.

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Activities Child Development Summer

Float On

Helping Your Preschooler Overcome A Fear of the Water

In case anyone’s keeping track, spring is quickly approaching its end. Here in San Diego, we’ve been experiencing something like the last dregs of winter, however, but per the calendar; the warmest time of the year is quickly on its way in. With something close to only four weeks left until summer solstice takes place, the stores have quickly filled with outdoor patio furniture, barbecues, Fourth of July gear, and swimming supplies. Despite summer’s June 21 start date, anyone who’s everyone knows that summer really begins on Memorial Day weekend, leaving you and your family only a short week and a half from the beginning of outdoor cookouts, short sleeves, and pool days.

My own husband only in recent years has decided he’s comfortable in the water, having spent the majority of his life hovering preschooler swimmingclose to the edge from a traumatizing near-drowning experience as a child. Unfortunately for him, despite his fears he was never reintroduced to the water, leaving him uncertain of its depths, and fierce oceanic waves. Yet, as he’s grown older he’s spent his time learning to cope with the fear and now even water-skis when we visit our family’s lake house.

No matter a person’s age, fear of the water can strike when you least expect it, but for those of us with preschool aged children, that fear seems to be a constant issue. Luckily, this summer you can start your toddler off early and get them in the water. Whether they have been in the water and are uncomfortable or if it’s an experience you will be embarking upon for the first time, getting your child to be accepting of the water early on will help keep them from being fearful in their later years, leaving you free to hit the beach or pool throughout the summer.

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Child Development

Talk the Talk and Walk the Walk

Helping You Deal With Your Toddler’s Shyness

Over spring break, my older cousin and his family came out to San Diego to visit. Aside from being excited to see my cousin, who was always more like a brother than a cousin, I was overjoyed to see his two kids, both of whom are under the age of five and hardly know me. Given that I see his kids usually only twice a year and that they are both at ages where strangers make them uncomfortable, his kids have a tendency to clam up quickly when in their distant family member’s presence. In fact his oldest, Hannah, not only instantly ducked her head into her daddy’s shoulder when I said hello, but wouldn’t talk to me until two days after they’d come to visit.preschool

This, in contrast to the two young cousins who live in the same city as me, and my cousin’s wife was panicking slightly, worrying if her kids would ever be as comfortable around their extended family to exchange more than a handful of glances. Knowing a thing about the toddler age group, I attempted to lull my cousin’s concerns about her children, insisting that shyness is something they’re likely to grow out of—at least to an extent. This tied in with the fact that she mentioned that it’s not something that suddenly occurred and rather was shyness noticed over the past several years, and I begged her not to worry. Some toddlers, I explained, are naturally quiet in social situations. Some even grow up to be quiet adults, comfortable in their introspective personalities, which is perfectly normal and often not something to ever be concerned with. However, for parents unsure of their child’s inability to hold eye contact with friends and family, or for those kids who have problems with verbal communication there are some tips and tricks to put to use to help assuage the problems.

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